Hybrids & Electrics

How the Tesla Cybertruck Electric Pickup’s Specs Compare to the Competition

With the Tesla Cybertruck’s reveal, another electric pickup truck as officially stepped into the ring. And while the looks are an acquired taste for some, the numbers are perhaps the more important feature. Not only does Tesla’s electric truck have to overcome range anxiety, it has to prove it can tow and haul just as much as its rivals. Or, considering the price points of the Rivian R1T and Bollinger B2, at least be cheaper. Let’s take a closer look at how the Tesla Cybertruck’s specs compare to the electric pickup truck competition.

Tesla Cybertruck specs: towing, payload, range

Tesla Cybertruck
Tesla Cybertruck | Tesla

As both we and Autoweek have reported, the Cybertruck will be available in three configurations. There will be a single-motor rear-wheel drive version, as well as dual- and tri-motor all-wheel drive trucks. The single- and dual-motor versions should start production in late 2021, with the tri-motor coming a year later.

The single-motor Cybertruck will be the cheapest, starting at $39,900. Though, knowing Tesla, very few examples that cheap will be built. Range is quoted as ‘250-plus miles’, with a 110-mph top speed and 0-60 coming in 6.5 seconds. Tesla claims it will be able to tow 7,500 lbs and carry 3,500.

Tesla Cybertruck
Tesla Cybertruck | Tesla

The dual-motor truck will start at $49,900. Top speed increases to 120 mph, while 0-60 drops to 4.5 seconds. Range also increases, to approximately 300 miles. Payload is the same—most likely the increased weight balancing out increased power—but towing capacity increases to 10,000 lbs.

Tesla Cybertruck
Tesla Cybertruck interior | Tesla

Finally, the tri-motor version. At $69,900 it will be the most expensive Cybertruck trim. But with a range of over 500 miles, a 0-60 time of 2.9 seconds, and a top speed of 130 mph, it will be the fastest. Payload is again 3,500 lbs, but the tri-motor Cybertruck will be able to tow 14,000 lbs.

Tesla Cybertruck | Tesla-00
Tesla Cybertruck | Tesla

Every Cybertruck will come with standard adaptive air suspension; Road & Track reports a max ground clearance of 16”. Each truck will also have a 6.5-ft bed, which, combined with lockable storage, will give 100 cubic feet of space. Each truck will also have seating for six. Elon Musk has also confirmed, Motor1 reports, that the camping set-up shown will be available as an accessory.

The competition’s specs

Bollinger B2
Bollinger B2 | Bollinger

Tesla’s biggest competitors, at the moment, are the Rivian R1T and Bollinger B2. None of these trucks is currently available. However, both the R1T and B2 are scheduled to debut in 2020, a full year ahead of the Tesla Cybertruck.

Bollinger Interior
Bollinger Interior | Bollinger

The Bollinger B2 will only be available in dual-motor all-wheel drive form, starting at $125,000. Bollinger claims a 200-mile range and a top speed of 100 mph. The B2 will also have a payload capacity of 5,000 lbs and be capable of towing 7,500 lbs. Maximum ground clearance as 20”.

2020 Rivian R1T
2020 Rivian R1T | Rivian

The Rivian R1T, like the Cybertruck, will also have a range of trim levels. However, unlike Tesla, the R1T trims only by battery capacity, not the number of motors.

2020 Rivian R1T
2020 Rivian R1T | Rivian

Each R1T will have four motors and all-wheel drive and is rated at 750 hp. The largest pack, at 180-kWh, should be good for a 400-mile range and 125-mph top speed. Range and top speed for the 135-kWh and 105-kWh versions haven’t been released. However, the smallest-capacity R1T will start at $69,000—although it won’t be available until 2021. Rivian claims a 14.1” ground clearance, and an 11,000-lb towing capacity. No payload capacity is available.

How the competition stacks up to the Tesla electric pickup truck

Both the single- and dual-motor Cybertrucks are cheaper than the R1T or B2. The Cybertruck will also be faster and have a higher range than the B2, even in single-motor form. However, both the Bollinger and Rivian trucks will debut ahead of the Tesla. Especially where the Rivian R1T is concerned, that is a huge setback for Tesla. Although the B2 is marketed as the most off-road-ready of the three electric pickups, Tesla’s camper tent appears to be aimed straight at Rivian.

How the production Tesla pickup truck compares to the rumors

Tesla Cybertruck
Tesla Cybertruck | Tesla

Beyond the camping accessories, Tesla also unveiled an ATV that fit in the Cybertruck’s bed and recharged from its battery. That wasn’t something the initial rumors or later speculation foresaw.

Where price and range are concerned, the rumors were fairly accurate. Tesla was targeting a price somewhere around $50,000 and a range of 400-500 miles. The two are mutually exclusive, but the goals were achieved.

However, previous comments about the motors and towing capacities were significantly different from the production version. InsideEVs had previously reported that each wheel was supposed to have its own motor. Musk had also said in the past that his towing goal was 300,000 lbs.

There are a ton of details and information to unpack from the Cybertruck’s reveal. And properly comparing it to the competition requires a full-scale, on- and off-road drive. But it is clear that, even if Tesla didn’t meet every Cybertruck goal, it is an impressive electric pickup truck.