Trucks & SUVs

Is The Chevy Trail Boss The Best Upgrade For Off-Roading?

There are some premium off-roading trucks on the road like the Ford Raptor and Dodge Rebel. But how does the Chevy Silverado Trail Boss compare? Can it compete as an off-roading truck, or will it get stuck in the mud? Let’s review it’s specs and customer testimonials to see how the Trail Boss compares. 

How Capable Is The Chevy Silverado Trail Boss? 

The Chevy Silverado Trail Boss is supposed to own the beaten path with the ability to dominate obstacles in its way. However, this amount of power and strength doesn’t come at a low cost.

2019 Chevrolet Silverado LT Trail Boss
2019 Chevrolet Silverado LT Trail Boss | Chevrolet

To get started in a 2020 Chevy Trail Boss, you will spend around $48k. This price makes the Trail Boss competitive against the Ford Raptor that starts around $53k, but the Ram Rebel is cheaper at $43k. 

Also, in the Silverado Trail Boss, you can upgrade to the turbo diesel engine to have a fuel efficiency of up to 22 mpg in the city and 33 mpg on this highway. 

Like other big trucks, the Chevy Trail Boss isn’t exactly fuel-efficient. It gets up to 16 mpg in the city and 22 mpg on the highway. However, the Ram Rebel gets a surprising 32 mpg on the highway. 

Chevy Silverado Trail Boss Power 

The Chevy Silverado Trail Boss has five different engine options to consider. We are quite impressed by the 6.2-liter EcoTech V8 engine that pumps out 420 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque. This engine can tow up to 13,400 lb. 

The 3.0-liter Duramax Turbo Diesel I-6 engine produces 277 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque with the ability to haul up to 9,300 lb. 

With the Trail Boss, you get a 2” lift, to have a ground clearance of 10.9” of large 18” all-terrain tires that make cornering and control easier. 

By having a 28.-7 approach angle and 27.2-departure angle, the Trail Boss is well equipped to crawl over rocks and steep inclines. 

Chevy Silverado Trail Boss Features 

The Silverado Trail Boss provides a smooth and comfortable ride with an independent front suspension and mounted rear suspension. The 147” wheelbase only enhances comfort further, and the Rancho shocks absorb impacts. 

The undercarriage is protected with skid plates and a metal underbody transfer case shield. Also, a high capacity air intake cleaner to prevent dust and debris from getting in the engine. 

There are a variety of drive modes to select with a simple twist of a knob, including Sport, Off-Road, Snow/Ice, and more. 

However, we’re primarily interested in the Hill Descent Control, which automatically adjusts the engine torque and braking pressure to ensure that you make it down safely. Plus, the Silverado Trail Boss is equipped with four-wheel disc brakes. 

The Silverado Trail Boss also has 15 different camera angles, allowing you to see everything. This makes hitching a trailer and squeezing into tight spots much easier. 

Best of all, the Durabed truck bed has more cargo space than any other truck with 12 tie-downs. It’s lighter and stronger to help you get the job done.