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For the second time, Mazda is killing its mysterious MX-30 EV. Why mysterious? Because nobody could explain how an electric vehicle with only 100 miles of range can sell for $37,000. Or can sell at all, for that matter. And the numbers show this was the unfortunate case.

Introduced in 2020, the MX-30 was a novel car that established Mazda as part of the EV parade and not a bystander. It also helped the Japanese automaker as a California compliance vehicle, which is the only state it was available in. Of course, other than Japan and Europe, where it will still be available. 

How many Mazda MX-30 EVs have been sold?

White and black 2023 Mazda MX-30 EV
2023 Mazda MX-30 EV | Mazda

So let’s do the math, high buy-in for its range, only sells in Cali, and just a 100-mile range. Oh, and starting this year, there is no $7,500 tax credit anymore. There just wasn’t any there there, though the interior and exterior designs were appealing. 

As a consequence of its shortcomings, sales were dismal. Mazda sold only 181 in 2021 and 324 in 2022. So far this year, a grand total of 66 have found owners. And just like some of its Japanese rivals, Mazda’s EV plans are now definitely behind the curve.

Though Nissan virtually started the EV zeitgeist with the Leaf way back in 2010, it has left it to languish with only a facelift and small changes. On the other hand, Toyota has been able to only eke out one EV, the bZ4X, as it continues bleating about hydrogen power. As electrification is the face of future transportation, Japan has much catching up to do.

Is Mazda developing another EV?

2023 Mazda MX-30 PHEV chassis
2023 Mazda MX-30 R-EV PHEV chassis | Mazda
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2022 Mazda MX-30 EV Sales Are Almost as Disappointing as Its Range

There was some hope that with the addition of a rotary engine added to the MX-30’s portfolio, the range-extending PHEV would see more success. For Mazda fans, anything rotary, even the MX-30 R-EV’s 880cc 74 hp engine, generates a ton of interest. But that also adds to the mystery of the EV as the option never made it to our shores. 

Mazda killed the MX-30 last year in June. Then, it announced its rebirth for 2023. So as we’ve seen with the EV, there is always the chance it will magically pop back into existence in 2024, but we doubt it. Mazda took its swing at EV development and production and is now firmly behind a PHEV philosophy going forward. 

We look at hybrids as a stepping stone to full electrification. So there will be a big market for them in the next decade or so. But Europe and the U.S. have established the combustion engine’s demise, and it’s happening quicker than you, and Mazda, might think.

With more range and that hybrid version, the MX-30 could have been a decent stake in the EV ground. As it is, enthusiasts will always see it as this mysterious blip on the road to electric everything.