What Brand Truck Does the Ukrainian Military Drive?

The Ukrainian military drives Ukraine-built KrAZ trucks, many with Ford engines. In addition, many of its armored troop transports are based on Ford F-Series chassis, and its Army leverages hundreds of Humvees imported from the United States.

Avto KrAZ provides many trucks to the Ukranian military

Ukrainian military soldier holds a machine gune and smiles while sitting atop an armored vehicle flying a Ukraine flag.
Ukrainian soldier atop an armored vehicle | DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP via Getty Images

RELATED: What Brand Truck Does the Russian Military Drive?

The Kremenchuk Automobile Plant builds heavy-duty off-road trucks in Ukraine. The factory was originally built by the Soviet Union in 1946. Its Ukrainian name is the Kremenchutskyi Avtomobilnyi Zavod, or KrAZ for short. After Ukraine left the Soviet Union, KrAZ became a private company and continued to build trucks under the name AutoKrAZ.

The Ukrainian military favors several heavy-duty KrAZ platforms. The first is the 6×6 KrAZ-6322 “Soldier” which features a 14.86-liter 8-cylinder diesel engine, or 9.0-liter Ford EcoTorq, manual transmission, and 26,455 pound gross vehicle weight (GVW). Vehicles on this chassis include cargo trucks and the “Raptor” troop transport.

Another platform is the 4×4 Spetsnaz or KrAZ-5233BE. This truck uses the same 14.86-liter diesel, but with just two axles it has a payload capacity of just 13,225 pounds. KrAZ builds its “Shrek” armored troop transport on this chassis.

The KrAZ Spartan troop carrier is a Ford F-series at heart

KrAZ armored troop transport driving down a road in Ukraine.
KrAZ Spartan leading a convoy | Aytac Unal/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

RELATED: The Russian Army Is Cummins Powered

KrAZ also builds several smaller armored troop transports. These includes the 4×4, gasoline or diesel-powered Cougar which has a GVW of 13,000 pounds. The diesel-powered Spartan 4×4 has a GVW of 19,400 pounds.

Even though the Spartan armored troop carrier is a common sight in Ukraine, it did not originate there. The Spartan was originally designed in Ontario, Canada.

The STREIT Group is a multi-national armored vehicle company headquartered in the United Arab Emirates. But STREIT has a facility in Innisfil, Ontario Canada. Its the Ontario facility that not only engineered, but began production of the Spartan.

Because the Spartan originated in North America, it is not shocking that at its core is a Ford F550 chassis with a “Scorpion” 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel V8. The Scorpion makes 400 horsepower, has 4WD, and an automatic transmission. It can carry two crew members and 6 soldiers, shielding them from assault rifle fire and grenades.

After the international success of the Spartan, STREIT licensed KrAZ to build the vehicle in Ukraine. KrAZ builds its own Spartan to sell to the Ukrainian military.

The United States has donated hundreds of Humvees to Ukraine

Ukraine military men at an airport, inspecting a row of Humvees donated by the United States.
Ukrainian soldiers inspecting donated Humvees | SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP via Getty Images

RELATED: The History of AWD Vs. 4WD

The Ukrainian military also leverages U.S.-built Humvees. In 2015 alone, the United States gave over 100 Humvees to the Ukrainian military.

After 2015, the United States continued to send regular shipments of Humvees in various configurations: armored troop carriers, ambulances, etc. as part of larger aid packages.

In December 2020, the United States passed the Ukrainian Security Assistance Initiative and sent 84 boats to the Ukrainian Navy and another shipment of Humvees to the Ukrainian Army. According to the U.S. Embassy, this specific shipment included 20 Humvees.

The United States has shipped over 300 Humvees to Ukraine. It’s unclear how many are still operating in the Ukrainian military, but they are a common sight. According to The Drive, one American Humvee presumably captured from Ukraine appeared in a Russian military convoy.

Next, read all about the SUVs of the Ukrainian military.

RELATED: Here’s How Your Ram Power Wagon Got Its Epic Name