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Three Honda Ridgeline Reviews You Need to Read Before Buying

For drivers in the midsize truck world, few trucks are as controversial as the Honda Ridgeline. People either love them or hate them and, while we think there are more polarizing things out there, it’s easy to see why. The Ridgeline is one of the smallest midsize trucks on the market. It’s so much smaller than its competitors, in fact, that some people consider it more of an SUV than a pickup truck. Well, we’re here to share some of the Ridgeline’s most informing reviews with you, so you can decide whether you’re a fan or not.

“Practical without being unparkably huge”

As stated in a review by Car and Driver, the Ridgeline is a practical size for a midsize truck. When you’re looking for an everyday truck, you’re not looking for something gargantuan that can haul something as big as a house – you need something that will get you decent gas mileage and can tow the occasional load. That’s just what you’ll get with the Ridgeline. It averages about 20 mpg and can handle up to 5,000 lbs towing capacity, and many drivers report excellent fuel economy while towing.

Car and Driver also discussed the look of adding the bed cap to the truck bed. The bed cap is a controversial addition to the Ridgeline; some people think it looks ugly and doesn’t match the style, while others think it looks fine and is a practical protective layer. Overall, the consensus seems to be that if you don’t like it, then you shouldn’t get it. It provides more room than a tonneau cover would, but less room than if you had no cover at all. The shape of the dome doesn’t quite match the cab’s shape, so if that bothers you right away, it will probably continue to the longer you have it.

“It’s the truck you actually need, not the one you want”

That’s perhaps the best summary of the Ridgeline. It’s not necessarily exciting, but it’s one of the most reliable midsize trucks available. In a review from Autoblog, they share their opinions after testing out a Ridgeline in a longterm test drive. The 280 horsepower, 3.5-liter V6 engine gives enough power to haul loads as needed, from weekend adventures to moving furniture – anything you need in an “every now and then” sort of capacity. It offers a smooth ride during your daily commute to work and doesn’t feel out of place as an everyday vehicle.

The biggest downside that Autoblog points out is that the Ridgeline isn’t a very “manly” truck. It does have less power than some of its competitors and it is overall smaller than many others. If ruggedness is important to you, then the Ridgeline may not be your winner, but keep in mind that it’s one of the more practical midsizers out there.

“The Trucklet”

MotorTrend coined this phrase for the Ridgeline, as a way to describe how it’s an amalgamation of a truck and an SUV. The Trucklet, which they agree is polarizing and controversial, would be perfect for city folks who like to spend their weekends trucking through mud and much. They say that the ride is smooth and good for everyday driving, but the positives stop there.

In their review, they’re not as big of fans of the Ridgeline as the others we’ve mentioned. They feel that there is better value and power to be found in the Ridgeline’s competitors. Other midsize trucks, like the Tacoma and the Colorado, offer more towing capacity and a more powerful engine. But, truth be told, that’s sort of the point of the Ridgeline. It’s for people who prefer a practical everyday ride, with the occasional need for more muscle. If that sounds like you, then get to a lot to test drive one soon!