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Is Where You Live On This List Of Worst Roads In the US?

Yes, it’s that time of the year. As we enter the November elections we are reminded of the promises for improving infrastructure. With crumbling bridges, potholed streets, and plenty of out-of-work able-bodied men and women nothing is happening. So we’ll take a gander at which states and cities have the worst roads in the US? Is where you live on this list? Let’s see…

The ever-worsening pandemic has strangled budgets so much those cracked and beat up roads may not be repaired for years. If you’re lucky, your city took advantage of the lockdown for COVID-19 to get the crews out and fix roads and bridges. But according to Bloomberg, there are more than 700 cities that have already given notice there will be infrastructure cuts. 

Over five years it will cost an estimated $15 billion in damages to cars

Evening traffic leaving Los Angeles on 405 freeway North at 5pm. | Getty

Funding for different states can vary significantly. And the results can cost you plenty. Potholes beat the hell out of your car, its tires and suspensions. Over five years it will cost an estimated $15 billion in damages to cars and trucks. That’s according to a 2016 report from the American Automobile Association. They even figured that each time you hit a pothole it averages about $300 in repairs or damages. 

So the bad news is if you live in California three large cities with high-percentages of bad roads are there. That’s according to CoPilot, a car-buying app that analyzed the 2018 Federal Highway Administration data. In a similar report from 2016, San Francisco was crowned the worst in the country. And anecdotally we can confirm from a recent trip there that the streets especially in the city and around Chinatown are pretty bad. 

RELATED: Buckle Up! This Is the Most Dangerous Country to Drive In

Rhode Island, California, and New Jersey, have the most urban roads in poor shape

Traffic fills the 110 freeway during rush hour, in downtown Los Angeles, CA. | Getty

But three states: Rhode Island, California, and New Jersey, have the most urban roads in poor shape. Whether small, midsize, or large cities, California has a higher percentage of bad roads than the next worst state. For small cities, Merced, Antioch, Vallejo, Simi Valley, and Santa Cruz-all in Cali, scored the worst.

For medium size cities the top five were Concord, California; Honolulu, Hawaii; South Orange County, California; Flint, Michigan; and Modesto, California. For large cities topping the list is San Francisco/Oakland, California, with over 71% of their major roads in poor condition. Next is nearby San Jose, California, with 63% of its major roads considered in poor condition. 

Fifth on the list is Detroit, Michigan, with almost the same as Detroit in poor condition

Traffic jam is reflecting in a driving mirror on the airport access road | Getty

The third is Los Angeles/Long Beach, California, with almost 63% of its major roads in poor condition. Next is New York/Newark, New Jersey with over 45% of major roads in poor shape. Fifth on the list is Detroit, Michigan, with almost the same as Detroit in poor condition. 

CoPilot also found that when the roads are better people drive those roads more. It seems logical, but do city fathers understand that businesses that are located on the bad roads are seeing less use. That means less business. It also means that cities that are more spread out have better roads. 

So those condensed, congested cities with poor conditions ironically have fewer roads to take care of. They should also see a greater amount of taxes paid by both businesses and residents that are stacked in apartments and condos. So there should be a larger amount of funds available for repairs. Apparently, there isn’t.