Ford Kills Mustang Bullitt and Shelby GT350

There is much to do about the transition from 2020 to 2021 Ford Mustang models. As we approach the end of the S550 Mustang, Ford has decided to whittle down the number of models. Unfortunately, the models it has chosen to kill are some of the most iconic in the Mustang’s history. Ford has decided to kill the Mustang Bullitt and Shelby GT 350. We’ll explore why this is not good.

Production ended for both of these Mustangs at the end of 2020

2020 Shelby American Ford Mustang GT350 Anniversary Edition | Shelby American

Production ended for both of these Mustangs at the end of 2020. So right now you can’t order a new GT 350 or Bullitt. But you can snag one that is languishing on a dealer’s lot. That is if you can find one. Either that or find one used. 

Multiple sources indicate that while there are a smattering of new GT350 Mustangs located across the country, the Bullitt versions are not plentiful at all. While a bit of fanfare was expected for the end of GT350 and Bullitt production, the Shelby GT350 Heritage Edition is the extent of Ford patting itself on the back. It is all we can expect for Ford’s sendoff of one of the most potent production cars ever made. 

Elimination of the Bullitt and GT350 makes room for the Mustang Mach 1

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt is on display at the 110th Annual Chicago Auto Show
The Ford Mustang Bullitt | Getty

The elimination of the Bullitt and GT350 makes room for the 2021 Mustang Mach 1. With Coyote V8 power it offers both handling and driving dynamics most looking to purchase a Mustang will find it excellent. It doesn’t compare to the flat-plane crank Voodoo engine found in the GT350, but things could be worse.

The Voodoo engine that Ford developed was the rare incorporation of a flat-plane crank configuration with an American V8. With 526 hp the combo could zing up to 8250 rpm. There was nothing like it before or since.

Bolstering the two models was the movie behind the Bullitt and Shelby connection of the 350GT

American actor Steve McQueen (1930 - 1980) (as Frank Bullitt) hangs his arm out the driverside window of a car in a scene from 'Bullitt' (directed by Peter Yates), California, 1968.
American actor Steve McQueen hangs his arm out the driverside window in a scene from Bullitt | Getty

RELATED: Ford Just Killed the Mustang Shelby GT350 and GT350R

Helping to bolster the two models was the movie background behind the Bullitt and Shelby connection of the 350GT. But enthusiasts knew that there was much more to these two Mustangs than their famous connections. We expect that both models will be some of the first vehicles from the 2020s that will hit collector status.

If you’re so inclined you can pick one up now, drive the dog snot out of it, then retire it and watch it appreciate. How the electrification of the auto world will affect values is almost moot. The thrill is in driving a unique ground pounder that won’t depreciate. Or if it does it is only a blip.