7 Car Fads That Victimized Our Wallets and Sensibilities

Have you been victimized? Did you see some of the previous car fads offered in the auto market and basically say, “take my money” with an open wallet. Some fads we’ve seen were accessories meant to make some cars look cool, sound amazing, and give them more capabilities, but not all of them. Here are seven that took our money and sensibilities.

Spinner Rims were a big thing for a short time

Customized Car with Massive Spinner Rims
Customized Car with Massive Spinner Rims | Shutterstock

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When it comes to car fads, Spinner Rims were certainly up near the top. These obnoxious-looking wheels had spinners on them that continued to rotate after the car came to a complete stop. For a few years, every third or fourth SUV or truck seemed to have a set of these wheels on it.

Huge Exhaust Pipes became one of the worst car fads of all time

Huge Exhaust Pipes Were a Thing
Huge Exhaust Pipes Were a Thing | Shutterstock

Movie influence in our lives is omnipresent. We often want to look, dress, or act like the movie stars we see, especially when we are young. Following the original Fast and the Furious movie release, street racing grew in popularity, as did loud and wide exhaust pipes. Some cars went from mild-mannered to ridiculous with the pipes put underneath that were loud and annoying.

The 1970s were all about the shag carpeting, even in the cars

1970s Van with Shag Carpet
1970s Van with Shag Carpet | Shutterstock

Some might think of the ‘70s fondly while others may not know much about it, but shag carpeting was everywhere. This was easily one of the biggest car fads of the decade that demanded money you shouldn’t have had to spend but probably did. Think of the proliferation of hippie vans and the comfort shag carpeting offered, but also think of how hard it was to clean.

Big subwoofers: a terrible car fad that insults your sensibilities

Speakers Take Up the Entire Rear Cargo Area
Speakers Take Up the Entire Rear Cargo Area; What a Waste | Shutterstock

Massive subwoofer boxes began to invade the trunk space of every customized vehicle in the early 2000s, according to Motor Junkie. This addition often took up the entire trunk leaving no room for what you might need to carry in your vehicle. No matter, we fell for it and became victims of insane levels of bass pouring out of the trunk.

We poured lots of money out for hood scoops; what a wasteful car fad

A Car Hood Scoop; cool for some cars, not for others
A Car Hood Scoop; Cool for Some Cars, Not for Others | Shutterstock

Hood scoops on muscle cars make sense. These items bring more air into the engine, giving the car more power. A hood scoop on a Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla, or Hyundai Elantra makes no sense at all. This was another one of the car fads influenced by “The Fast and the Furious” franchise.

Body cladding was one of the worst car fads of the early 2000s

Plastic Body Cladding on the Pontiac Aztek, this was a useless car fad
Plastic Body Cladding on the Pontiac Aztek | GM

Body cladding, especially plastic pieces drilled or glued on the body of an SUV, was a seriously wasteful car fad. These plastic items were originally meant to protect the bottom part of a vehicle when off-roading. This feature became so popular that many automakers began adding it to many SUVs in the early 2000s. Thankfully, it’s no longer a regular feature in the automotive world.

Thankfully, fake wood paneling is one of the now-dead car fads

Fake Wood Car Interior Paneling
Fake Wood Car Interior Paneling | Shutterstock

Another item from the 2000s that we’re glad disappeared is the addition of fake wood paneling to a vehicle. This paneling was glued over the top of some interior pieces to make it look like there was wood trim in the vehicle. These fake pieces would often fall off or crack, leaving an ugly interior appearance.

Next, find out why your car wheels have a black build-up on them or watch the video below about some other car fads:

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