2023 Mazda CX-50 Safety and ADAS Features: Everything You Need to Know

As Mazda expanded to North America with a new assembly plant, it released a 2023 model to celebrate the achievement. The Mazda and Toyota team in Huntsville, AL, collaborated with designers and engineers from Irvine, CA, where Mazda has its North American Operations headquarters, to create the Mazda CX-50.

Sharing a platform with the CX-30, the CX-50 is designed to compete with the Toyota RAV4, Nissan Rogue, and Hyundai Tucson. The new nameplate comes with an array of safety features and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) for the ultimate off-road experience. 

What the CX-50 has in store

A Mazda CX-50 safety features at work while driving on a dirt road.
Mazda CX-50 | Mazda North American Operations

 
The Mazda CX-50 features a rugged exterior, a different style from what the manufacturer usually offers. It targets SUV lovers who want a vehicle that can handle rugged roads without worrying about damaging the undercarriage. The crossover SUV is slightly bigger than the CX-5. However, it still offers the same occupancy as the CX-5 and CX-30, which is two rows of seats for five passengers.
 
All models come with a 187 hp, 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine. A turbocharged version making 256 hp is available. The six-speed automatic and all-wheel drive is standard. Mazda is working on a hybrid, which is expected to feature a Toyota powertrain.
 
Although unclear for how long, the CX-50 is available alongside the CX-5, which is on an older platform. The price ranges from $28,025 for the base trim level, the 2.5 S, to $42,775 for the Turbo Premium Plus. According to Consumer Reports, a destination charge of $1,225 applies for all CX-50 purchases.

 Mazda CX-50 safety features

 
Mazda USA says the 2023 CX-50 aims to ‘heighten your awareness’ with an expansive range of safety features. Expect standard ADAS features, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC), lane-keeping assistance, and lane departure warning. Other car safety features in the CX-50 include rear cross-traffic warning, blind spot warning, and pedestrian detection. Rear automatic braking is optional.
 
Mazda included adaptive front lighting on certain trims to help you drive comfortably on ‘dark, winding country roads.’ According to the IIHS, the LED adaptive headlights are among the best, and designed to boost visibility by pivoting when you do.
 
2.5 Turbo Premium Plus models come with the i-Activsense Safety suite, which offers front and rear parking sensors, Traffic Jam Assist, and 360° View Monitor. The lineup also includes smart brake support with front-drive and reverse-drive detection. Crash test reports for the CX-50 are not available.

Know more about ADAS

Mazda USA says the 2023 CX-50 aims to ‘heighten your awareness’ with an expansive range of safety features. Expect standard ADAS features, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC), lane-keeping assistance, and lane departure warning. Other car safety features in the CX-50 include rear cross-traffic warning, blind spot warning, and pedestrian detection. Rear automatic braking is optional.
 
Mazda included adaptive front lighting on certain trims to help you drive comfortably on ‘dark, winding country roads.’ According to the IIHS, the LED adaptive headlights are among the best, and designed to boost visibility by pivoting when you do.
 
2.5 Turbo Premium Plus models come with the i-Activsense Safety suite, which offers front and rear parking sensors, Traffic Jam Assist, and 360° View Monitor. The lineup also includes smart brake support with front-drive and reverse-drive detection. Crash test reports for the CX-50 are not available.
 
Mazda equipped the Cx-50 with a full suite of driver assistance features. Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, ADAS, have become almost standard in modern vehicles. The systems interface between drivers and their automobiles to reduce errors on the road. As Synopsys explains, ADA systems are designed to enhance car safety through improved warning features.
 
ADAS came into the picture in the early 2000s when different manufacturers incorporated varying safety technologies to improve their models. For example, the 2000 Toyota had dynamic laser cruise control, the 2006 Lexus LS featured lane keeping assist, while the 2008 GM included lane departure warning.
 
Most automakers have ADAS built into the original design and upgrade the system across models. ADA systems work by leveraging multiple data inputs. The data sources determine the safety features available. LiDAR (light detection and ranging), for instance, adds sensors and cameras to enhance computer vision to better distinguish between static and moving objects. A vehicle’s primary platform provides the data inputs, but a manufacturer can use other sources.
 
Car and Driver highlights the several benefits ADAS provides. The main one is that the systems alert drivers to potential dangers to give them enough time to react. Adaptive features, such as ACC, pedestrian crash avoidance mitigation, and automated lighting provide navigational warnings to minimize the risk of collisions.
 
Driver assistance systems and other safety features have improved exponentially and are expected to advance alongside vehicle engineering. 
 
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