Will the 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA Avoid a U.S. Release?

Our streets and highways still see millions of internal combustion engines, but their era seems to be nearing an end. And Tesla isn’t the only manufacturer looking to hasten an end to the gas-powered vehicles. Mercedes-Benz made this clear almost five years ago when it announced its EQ series, a platform developed for electric drivetrains.

The Mercedes-Benz EQA is one of six EQ models the German automaker promised to launch by 2022.

The Mercedes-Benz’s EQ series

With Tesla stealing all the headlines, it’s understandable to have assumed that brands like Mercedes-Benz were sitting on the sidelines. But Mercedes was merely playing a different card, sticking with compliance vehicles limited to states that require zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs).

Only 12 states have adopted the ZEV Program. They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. So to steal some of Tesla’s thunder, Mercedes would have to up its EV game tremendously. And it did just that by going full-on Tesla with all-electric sedans and SUVs.

Mercedes-Benz’s overall commitment to battery technology, electric motors, improved automation, connectivity, and car-sharing constitutes a transformation toward Silicon Valley.

Mercedes unclear on whether the EQA will make its way to the U.S.

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Not every EQ model will make its way to the United States’ market right away. The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA is one such model. A spokesperson for Mercedes-Benz told Car and Driver: “At this point, the EQA is still being considered for the U.S. market.”

The publication added that any EQA model manufactured for the U.S. would offer a more powerful drivetrain. Mercedes-Benz has also hinted at an all-wheel-drive EQA with 280 hp.

In 2022, versions of the EQS luxury sedan and EQE will begin production at Mercedes’ Tuscaloosa, Alabama plant. Both of these EQ models seem well-suited to the U.S. market. The EQE sedan and EQE SUV will be entry-level comparable to the C-Class. And the EQS sedan and EQS SUV will be comparable to the S-Class — top-of-the-line Benz models.

Because no other EQ model besides the EQA seems comparable to the GLA crossover, we’re banking on a U.S. version. After all, according to Mercedes-Benz, the EQA is the electric version of the second-generation GLA.

The Mercedes-Benz EQA shares similarities with the GLC-Class

Expanding Mercedes-Benz’s EQ line of electric vehicles, the 2022 EQA is slated to hit showrooms throughout Europe as early as this spring. According to MotorTrend, the EQA shares DNA with the larger EQC — the first EQ model — and the production version of the Generation EQ concept. Like the EQC, which shares mechanical aspects with the GLC-Class (except for its powertrain), the EQA is merely a stem on the GLA-Class branch. 

They both also share many of the same exterior characteristics, giving them a sleek and sporty look.

Nonetheless, whoever glances at the EQA will notice the many distinctions that set its exterior apart from the GLA-Class. The most notable is the EQA’s noteworthy fascias, headlights, turn signal lights, and running lamps. Its faux grille fluidly coalesces with a well-defined set of LED headlights; ornamental blue strips within the headlight housings add to the fascias’ sporty look. It also gives the 2022 EQA a familial likeness to the bigger EQC.

The EQA’a tailgate boasts a full-width light strip and a newly designed bumper cover fused with the license plate housing. Other distinctions are standard aero-enhanced wheels ranging from 18 to 20 inches and model-specific fender-mounted badges.

As of this writing, Mercedes-Benz hasn’t released many mechanical specifications for a stateside EQA. But we know Europe and China will get a 187-hp EQA, whose rear liftgate will bear the EQA250 badge. The 2021 EQC harnesses 402 hp and 561 lb-ft of torque and can go from 0 to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds, Car and Driver reports. The estimated price difference is only $12,000, so let them keep the EQA.