When Is It Time to Replace Your Volkswagen ID.4 Battery Under Warranty?

Volkswagen has vowed it will be carbon neutral by the year 2050. In its Way to Zero program, the goal is for 70% of all new Volkswagen cars in Europe to be fully electric by 2030. Eventually, it will begin to phase out gas-powered vehicles in its North American lineup as well. 

Although a latecomer to the EV game, Volkswagen has come out swinging in the EV market with offerings like the VW ID.4, which earned the 2021 World Car of the Year award. The ID.4 SUV is a little bit smaller than the brand’s Tiguan SUV. However, EV design is more efficient, so the ID.4 has about as much interior space as the Tiguan. 

Consumers who are planning to purchase any EV may be wondering about powertrain maintenance and warranty information. After all, there is no oil to change, but what about battery maintenance and warranties? There may also be concerns related to range and where to charge. Let’s take a look at some concerns you may have and when you should change your battery under warranty with the ID.4.

Taxes slow electric vehicle adoption
The Volkswagen ID.4 electric vehicle during the launch of its production | David Hecker/AFP via Getty Images

EV adoption has been slow for consumers, and for some very good reasons. Range anxiety is something that has held many consumers back from adopting EV technology. The fear is that the car’s battery will run down and they won’t be near a charging station. Since you can’t exactly fill a gas can with electric power to charge your vehicle, this is definitely a valid concern. 

Another concern is the lack of charging infrastructure. There are generally only a few miles between gas stations. However, there could be as many as hundreds of miles between charging stations depending on your location. So if you only have 50 miles left before your vehicle runs out of charge and the closest charging station is 100 miles away, you will be stranded. 

Another concern is battery degradation. We have all experienced battery degradation with our laptops, phones, and other electric devices. Therefore, consumers have expectations about batteries, and replacing the batteries in an EV can be costly. However, almost all EVs come with a warranty that will replace your battery if it begins to degrade.

Battery warranty with the ID.4

One of the most important aspects of your vehicle warranty with an EV is the battery warranty. According to Kelly Blue Book, the ID.4 has an eight-year/100,000 miles, whichever occurs first, warranty specific to the High Voltage Battery. The Volkswagen ID.4’s decently sized 82 kWh battery could easily exceed 300,000 to 400,000 miles before degradation sets in. The larger battery means you will get more life out of it.

Most EV manufacturers guarantee that an EV will retain 70% of its charging capacity during the eight years or 100,000-mile warranty. If it reaches a reduced capacity during that time, Volkswagen will replace the battery free of charge.

Specs on the ID.4

The ID.4 produces 201 hp with a single rear-mounted motor, but 295 hp with the dual-motor, all-wheel drive model. The towing capacity for this little SUV is an impressive 2,700 pounds. Acceleration is relatively slow in comparison with other EVs. The ID.4 goes from 0 to 60 mph in 7.6 seconds but jumps to 5.4 seconds with the dual-motor all-wheel drive configuration.

The rear-wheel-drive ID.4 Pro S is rated at 104 mpge city and 89 mpge highway by the EPA, with a driving range of 268 miles per charge. Meanwhile, the rear-wheel-drive Pro model is rated at 107 mpge city, 91 mpge highway, and up to 280 miles of driving per charge.

Battery issues are a common concern among consumers who are reluctant to make the switch to EVs. Volkswagen understood this and is offering a very generous warranty with the ID.4 in an effort to win over consumers that are still on the fence about EVs.

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