Cars

Volvo is Ready to Get Back to Business

Just like us people, the auto industry is trying to navigate our new normal amid the COVD-19 pandemic. Marking our current state as the “new normal” might be putting it lightly since we still being met with more uncertainty and new findings along with safety guidelines change every day. Volvo Cars is among the automakers ready to reopen its doors for production in Sweden after a short pause related to the coronavirus situation. 

Volvo’s scheduled reopening on April 20 follows the negotiations with related labor unions at its Sweden headquarters. As far as safety measures go, Volvo says that their facilities have been thoroughly disinfected during the temporary closure and that they will offer temperature checks upon entrance as well as “intensified” regular cleaning procedures. 

The production capacity at its Gothenburg, Sweden plant has been adjusted based on its current vehicle orders as well as its forecasted demand.  Volvo warns though that as customer demand picks back up, you may have to wait longer for new loans to be recognized and existed scheduled loans will also be affected. The carmaker expects a stronger sense or normalcy in June. 

Additional responses to COVID-19 

Volvo is among the many automakers partnering with health organizations to provide medical professionals with personal protective equipment and other critical supplies. In the U.S. specifically, Volvo introduced a project plan that provides essential medical professionals with transportation in major metropolitan areas, which gives them another viable way to get to work without using public transportation.

The automaker has also partnered with the volunteer org ConquerCOVID-19 in Canada to distribute medical equipment to those on the frontline and has partnered with the Red Cross in Brazil to help its community there as well.

Volvo is among the many automakers partnering with health organizations to provide medical professionals with personal protective equipment and other critical supplies. In the U.S. specifically, Volvo introduced a project plan that provides essential medical professionals with transportation in major metropolitan areas, which gives them another viable way to get to work without using public transportation.

The automaker has also partnered with the volunteer org ConquerCOVID-19 in Canada to distribute medical equipment to those on the frontline and has partnered with the Red Cross in Brazil to help its community there as well.

What else has Volvo been up to?

Volvo was recently honored with the Parents’ magazine 2020 Best Luxury Car award for its XC90 SUV. This award came at a good time to help the automaker’s image since its safety recall related to automatic emergency braking feature.

The Parents’ magazine reviewers celebrated the XC90 SUV for its chicness from end to end, as well as its updated braking system, and for being extremely car seat friendly. 

There is also a hybrid version of the XC90. The standard model starts at $48,350 or you can get the SUV for $800 per month through Volvo’s car subscription Care by Volvo. The Care by Volvo subscription fee includes your car payment, insurance, and maintenance. 

2019 Volvo XC40
2019 Volvo XC40 | Volvo

As far as recent sales reports go, COVID-19 significantly stifled Volvo’s overall performance. In the first quarter of 2020, Volvo sold 131,889 vehicles worldwide, a decrease of about 18 percent compared to the first quarter of 2019.

Volvo’s U.S. sales totaled out at 19,485 cars from January to March, an almost 12 percent decrease. The automaker sold 5,487 vehicles in the U.S. in March, a 42.7 percent decrease compared to March of 2019. Volvo’s SUV models including the XC40, XC60, and XC90 were the company’s top-selling vehicles in the U.S. for March.