Automotive News

This Crazy Camaro Was Used By US Special Forces In Bosnia

Why was a 1979 Camaro used by US Special Forces in war-torn Bosnia? How did it get there and how did US Special Forces use it? At that time the bad economic conditions and ethnic groups fighting each other led to an all-out war in Bosnia. NATO nations sent troops into the region to try and keep the peace and save innocent victims from the gunfighting and bombs. It was into this warzone in the 1990s that the crazy Camaro was performing a service.

Helge Meyer was a former Danish Special Forces soldier. During the Bosnian war, he wanted to provide humanitarian aid for the people of Bosnia. He came up with a plan. Meyer contacted the US Army commander in Bosnia about using a special vehicle to provide aid in Bosnia. He would need help from the US Army engineers. Would Special Forces approve of his plan?

Surprisingly the US Army allowed Meyer to deliver goods and supplies with his Camaro

Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer-4
Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer

Surprisingly, the US Army gave Meyer the green light which led to the creation of what became known as the “Ghost Car.” Now the building of this most unusual car would commence.

First, the Camaro was completely stripped. Armor plate was welded to certain exterior areas and also to the underside of the Camaro. In the front, a mine-clearing device was welded to the frame. The tires were special run-flat rubber. A steel plate was also welded in place of the rear window. The whole car was painted with a special matte-black paint that was applied to absorb infra-red light.

Testing showed the Camaro could hit 125 mph in 13 seconds loaded

Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer-5
Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer

Inside, heat detectors and night vision cameras were attached both inside and out. The 5.7-liter V8’s power was increased from 185 hp to 220 hp. Meyer installed a nitrous system to allow for fast squirts of 440 hp in case he needed to flee problems in a hurry. A little testing showed that the Ghost Car could hit 125 mph in 13 seconds loaded with 400 kg of food and other supplies.

To prepare for his efforts Meyer was provided with bullet-proof Kevlar armor and helmet. Ultimately the helmet took a bullet, saving Meyer’s life. From his days as a member of Denmark’s Delta Force called Jægerkorpset Meyer was familiar with Bosnian backroads. Armed with that knowledge and his faith he carried out all of his missions unarmed.

He would deliver goods and food to some of the ravaged areas of Bosnia. At the Rhein-Main Air Base in Germany, US soldiers there were able to raise $12,000 that Meyer used to buy everything from clothing to diapers, toys to medicine. He then loaded it into his Camaro and handed all of it out to Bosnians in crippled regions.

Most relief missions were done at night with the Camaro hidden during the day

Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer-5
Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer

Most missions were done at night. During the day the Camaro was hidden to avoid detection by enemies. At night, like something out of a movie, Meyer would sometimes be involved in car chases even taking on gunfire occasionally. He could always outrun hostile forces with the Ghost Car’s power and his knowledge of Bosnian backroads. He was unable to be detected with enemy radar. 

Meyer still has the Camaro, though it is now painted orange. He drives it often and has put over 100,000 miles on it.  


Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer-4
Bosnia Special Forces Camaro | Meyer