This $2.3 Billion Submarine Superyacht Could Be ‘The Future of Yachting’

Superyachts are relatively common among the billionaire class, with many spending large sums of money on getting a luxury floating mansion. Examples include Bernard Arnault’s yacht, the Symphony, and even Jeff Bezos is rumored to be building a $500 million megayacht.

While these boats are incredibly luxurious, they typically don’t feature underwater capabilities, like Migaloo’s submarine yacht. The Migaloo M7 is a $2.3 billion submarine superyacht that could be the future of yachting.

What the Migaloo M7 submarine yacht has to offer

A body of water filled with yachts and superyachts, like the submarine superyacht.
Body of water with yachts | Getty Images

The M7 is a superyacht design by Migaloo and the largest in the company’s M-series concepts. It has yet to be built, but if it were, it would be 930-ft long with a Zumwalt-class destroyer type body combined with some modern superyacht design details.

According to Autoevolution, some of the amenities in the design are pretty typical of most modern billionaire luxury yachts. They include a wellness area, spa, dining rooms, lounges, a swimming pool, jacuzzis, a cinema, gym, underwater viewing rooms, etc. There are also six dry hangers and storage for different underwater vehicles, including unmanned and autonomous options.

As for the accommodation, the Migaloo M7 can host up to 12 guests in eight VIP suites with additional separate quarters for 25 staff members. The owner’s suite stands out from the rest of the VIP suites with a 22,604 square feet living area.

Despite being a submarine yacht, the vessel offers open-air entertainment areas when sailing above the water’s surface. These areas are enclosed when the boat goes under. The owner would also have some creative input on the design choices in the boat, making it incredibly personalizable.

Safety is also well-catered to in the design with provisions for surface-to-air missiles and anti-torpedoes.

Performance-wise the M7 should achieve a 32-knots travel speed above water with hybrid engines to propel it along. The vessel can also go 1500 ft below the surface, although this cuts the propulsion speed to 21 knots.

Notably, while the actual price tag for the submarine yacht is yet to be determined, Migaloo’s CEO, Christian Gumpold, admitted that Bloomberg‘s estimated $2.3 billion figure wasn’t far off the mark. This would make it one of the world’s most expensive privately-owned assets. However, currently, it’s only available as a design and an NFT.

What is Migaloo, and how does it fit into the superyacht industry?

The Migaloo brand is named after an albino humpback whale which seems entirely appropriate since the company designs submarine superyachts. The company believes that the evolution of conventional megayachts has reached its peak, and subsequently, it can’t satisfy new owners’ needs.

According to Migaloo, some of these needs include privacy, security, unique experiences, and the greatest possible exclusivity. By combining submarines and superyachts, the company offers something different from the status quo and would therefore be able to meet current owner demands. As such, it makes sense why Christian Gumpold, the CEO, believes it is “the future of yachting.”

Other offerings on the Migaloo submarine superyacht

Other M-series submarine superyacht designs available on the Migaloo Portfolio include the M5_Cruise, the M5_ Super, M5, and M2. The smallest in the line-up, the M2, is 229 ft long, making it slightly smaller than Donald Trump’s yacht, the Trump Princess.

Migaloo also has another unique design offering in a private floating habitat dubbed Kokomo Ailand. It’s meant to be 383 ft long with an owner’s deck, jungle deck, beach deck, garden deck, and even a spa deck. The Island would also be mobile with an azipod propulsion system.

While there’s currently no eccentric billionaire who’s claimed the designs for themselves, it would certainly be interesting to see these concepts take physical shape.

RELATED: Forget About Flying Cars, What About Amphibious Cars?