Trucks & SUVs

The Worst Used Toyota Sequoia Model Years

There are some great used Toyota Sequoia model years, and there are some terrible options. The Toyota Sequoia is one of the most dependable vehicles on the road, but if you pick the wrong used option, you might not get the mileage you want. 

The Worst Used Toyota Sequoia Model Years 

To be clear, we are discussing the used Toyota Sequoia model years from the past decade. Older Toyota Sequoia models from the early 2000s have a lot more complaints than in recent years, but it can be a gamble to pick an SUV that’s almost 20 years old. 

2020 Toyota Sequoia off-roading
2020 Toyota Sequoia | Toyota

Be sure to do your due diligence and research before buying a project SUV. An option without custom mods will be easier to craft into the off-roader you want and may come with fewer surprises. 

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Also, we are determining the worst Toyota Sequoia model years based on driver feedback. CarComplaints allows drivers to provide their real experiences with the Toyota Sequoia, and lists complaints that people posted to the NHTSA. 

The 2017 Toyota Sequoia 

You can find a used 2017 Toyota Sequoia for about $38k to $49k based on what build you choose and your area. However, you might not want to. It’s one of the most complained about model years in recent history. 

That being said, it’s only racked up a total of 9 complaints on the CarComplaints forum. One complaint was about the door handles rusting. Another complaint from the NHTSA includes body issues with loud noises. While going around 65 mpg, the driver noticed the sound of metal scraping on metal and a high pitched whistle from the windshield. 

2020 Toyota Sequoia on-road
2020 Toyota Sequoia on-road | Toyota

Tech-wise, one driver noticed that their heated seats didn’t get very warm, but was told that the issue could not be corrected. Another driver experienced an electrical wiring issue. When they accelerated, their Sequoia wouldn’t pick up speed. However, it was found that rodents chewed through the wiring. 

The 2014 Toyota Sequoia 

The 2014 Toyota Sequoia ranges from $19k to $39k depending on what build you can find in your area, providing some savings compared to the 2017 model year. However, it has more concentrated issues with the transmission

One driver found that their 2014 Toyota Sequoia was incredibly loud when operating at 1,800 RPM. At the dealership, Toyota technicians agreed that the Sequoia was very loud, but determined that there wasn’t an issue. This left the owner out of luck. 

Another driver found that their 2014 Toyota Sequoia had harsh shifts at low speeds. They had a similar issue with their 2008 Sequoia. Another driver had to deal with their 2014 Sequoia needing transmission repairs after seven months of ownership. 

2020 Toyota Sequoia TRD Pro is on display at the 111th Annual Chicago Auto Show at McCormick Place
The 2020 Toyota Sequoia | Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Other drivers had to face electrical problems. One driver noticed that their parking sensors didn’t work after the rear sonar failed to detect a light pole while backing up. The sonar also failed to detect obstacles in the front. At the dealership, the driver was told to pretend that the Sequoia didn’t have sonar. 

One driver also noticed that they couldn’t see their instrument panel. The gauges were very dim while driving at highway speeds, making it difficult to see how fast they were going and other important information, such as the oil gauge and RPMs.