Tesla Autopilot Consumer Reports Ranking Falls

It doesn’t take much to remember a time when Tesla Autopilot was the standard in advanced driver assistance features. The tech forced other automakers to follow suit. Cadillac, Ford, BMW, and others have developed their own semi-autonomous driving features since. And while those companies are moving forward, the latest Consumer Reports ranking pushes Tesla Autopilot down the list.

A blue Tesla Model S in the city
Tesla Model S | Tesla

Consumer Reports ADAS Rankings

The most recent Consumer Reports ranking puts Tesla Autopilot outside the top five for the first time since its inception. In fact, Tesla Autopilot now ranks seventh overall. In the lead is Ford with BlueCruise, while GM’s SuperCruise and the Mercedes-Benz Driver Assistance system follow. The other three brands to top Tesla are BMW, Toyota, and Volkswagen.

How the Tesla Autopilot Consumer Reports ranking has fallen so far

While other companies’ advancements have helped move them forward, there are other reasons behind the Tesla Autopilot tumble down Consumer Reports rankings. While the Autopilot system has added some features, Tesla’s failure to improve the base technology is an issue. In a statement, Consumer Reports’ Jake Fisher stated, “After all this time, Autopilot still doesn’t allow collaborative steering and doesn’t have an effective driver monitoring system. While other automakers have evolved their ACC and LCA systems, Tesla has simply fallen behind.”

In short, the issue stems from something that many take issue with regarding Tesla Autopilot. While Tesla scored high in Capabilities and Performance, the scores for Keeping Driver Engaged and Unresponsive Driver were lower than most.

Lawsuits aren’t to blame, but Consumer Reports includes similar reasoning in Tesla Autopilot scoring

A complaint filed in late 2022 is calling Tesla Autopilot and Full-Self Driving language “deceptive”. It accuses Tesla and CEO Elon Musk of deceptively advertising the technology as fully functioning despite knowledge that this was not the case. The claim also states that the deception led to unsafe operation by Tesla owners who believed the system was capable of driving without intervention.

The latest Tesla Autopilot Consumer Reports ranking doesn’t address the suit directly. However, the lack of driver attention monitoring is a factor in both the lawsuit and their latest drop in CR rankings. Meanwhile, driver attention warnings are included in all of the systems that now outrank Tesla. Even vehicles from Hyundai and KIA include a Driver Attention Warning, even if they don’t offer semi-autonomous driving.

How ADAS Systems are scored by Consumer Reports

In simple terms, advanced driver assistance systems are scored based on both the underlying tech and their real-world function. While Ford and GM’s systems allow for collaborative steering between the driver and self-driving functions, Tesla’s does not. In Consumer Reports scoring, Ford’s system earned 84 points out of 100. Meanwhile, GM’s SuperCruise earned 79 points. By comparison, Tesla Autopilot earned just 61 points. 

Scores for this test were tabulated using several factors. Capabilities and Performance related to real-world reactions. Keeping the Driver Engaged and Unresponsive Driver scores relate to how the system works to keep your eyes on the road. Ease of Use factors the simplicity of activating the system while driving. And Clear When Safe to Use scores how the system lets you know when you’re allowed to engage hands-free driving.

The most recent Consumer Reports ranking puts Tesla Autopilot outside the top five for the first time since its inception. In fact, Tesla Autopilot now ranks seventh overall. In the lead is Ford with BlueCruise, while GM’s SuperCruise and the Mercedes-Benz Driver Assistance system follow. The other three brands to top Tesla are BMW, Toyota, and Volkswagen.

How the Tesla Autopilot Consumer Reports ranking has fallen so far

While other companies’ advancements have helped move them forward, there are other reasons behind the Tesla Autopilot tumble down Consumer Reports rankings. While the Autopilot system has added some features, Tesla’s failure to improve the base technology is an issue. In a statement, Consumer Reports’ Jake Fisher stated, “After all this time, Autopilot still doesn’t allow collaborative steering and doesn’t have an effective driver monitoring system. While other automakers have evolved their ACC and LCA systems, Tesla has simply fallen behind.”

In short, the issue stems from something that many take issue with regarding Tesla Autopilot. While Tesla scored high in Capabilities and Performance, the scores for Keeping Driver Engaged and Unresponsive Driver were lower than most.

A red Tesla Model 3 on a desert road
The Tesla Model 3 | Tesla
Related Why the NHTSA Data on Tesla Autopilot Crashes Is Misleading

Why the NHTSA Data on Tesla Autopilot Crashes Is Misleading

Lawsuits aren’t to blame, but Consumer Reports includes similar reasoning in Tesla Autopilot scoring

A complaint filed in late 2022 is calling Tesla Autopilot and Full-Self Driving language “deceptive”. It accuses Tesla and CEO Elon Musk of deceptively advertising the technology as fully functioning despite knowledge that this was not the case. The claim also states that the deception led to unsafe operation by Tesla owners who believed the system was capable of driving without intervention.

The latest Tesla Autopilot Consumer Reports ranking doesn’t address the suit directly. However, the lack of driver attention monitoring is a factor in both the lawsuit and their latest drop in CR rankings. Meanwhile, driver attention warnings come with all of the systems that now outrank Tesla. Even vehicles from Hyundai and KIA include a Driver Attention Warning, even if they don’t offer semi-autonomous driving.

How Consumer Reports scores ADAS systems

In simple terms, advanced driver assistance system scoring is based on both the underlying tech and their real-world function. While Ford and GM’s systems allow for collaborative steering between the driver and self-driving functions, Tesla’s does not. In Consumer Reports scoring, Ford’s system earned 84 points out of 100. Meanwhile, GM’s SuperCruise earned 79 points. By comparison, Tesla Autopilot earned just 61 points. 

This test uses several factors to determine a total score. Capabilities and Performance related to real-world reactions. Keeping the Driver Engaged and Unresponsive Driver scores relate to how the system works to keep your eyes on the road. Ease of Use factors the simplicity of activating the system while driving. And Clear When Safe to Use scores how the system lets you know when you’re allowed to engage hands-free driving.