Tips, Tricks & Trends

Rusty Monday: Derelict Corvettes-Wasted But Not Rusted

Yes, it’s blasphemy to showcase derelict Corvettes in Rusty Monday. Corvettes don’t rust. Well, at least the bodies don’t. There are plenty that at one time or another had frames rusted in half. But generally, rust is not associated with a Corvette. Nonetheless, we present derelict Corvettes that are wasted but not rusted.

And we’re not talking C6 or C5 Corvettes. We’ve got the nitty-gritty here. First and second-gen Corvettes. The motherlode. So check out these wrecks and shed a tear. But remember that most if not all of them can be brought back. It is just a matter of if the owners have finally decided that they are too poor, lazy, or busy to take on rebuilding these machines. 

1959/60 Corvette

1959-60 Corvette | Facebook

This looks to be a drag racing refugee. A lot of Corvettes were raced so this should come as no surprise. What is surprising is how complete it is. Right down to the top. Yeah, the bumpers are missing but those are easy. 

Other than the missing windshield which is now holding a striped sheet, this looks to be protected from the elements. We don’t know how old this picture is but we hope that at this point this first-gen model has been scooped up and is as bright and shiny as the day it was purchased. 

1963 Corvette #1

1963 Corvette | Facebook

RELATED: Rusty Monday: Cars Vs. Trees In Rustober

This is so complete it even has the trim around the split rear windows. Try finding that for sale on eBay. And if you do they’re plenty pricey. Still, this split-window would be an extensive but easy restoration. Those flared fenders were a typical mod. So was cutting the split out and making it look like a 1964 Corvette. Thankfully, this one is still split.

It’s pretty amazing how a car that goes for around $100,000 in decent shape can be found in this condition. Whether it has happened yet or not this will one day get restored. Once the owner dies or the son or nephew figures out how much it will cost to restore expect it to pop up on the interweb. 

Spacey Corvette

Second-gen Corvette former show car | Facebook

We have no idea what is going on here nor do we need to know. What is evident is that this was once a second-gen Corvette. Now, it’s a mess. It is doubtful this could be restored to anything other than its once show car glory. Hopefully, it was a really special custom show car. Otherwise, it’s not worth thinking about let alone actually trying to do a resto or restomod from it. We’d say this one is pretty much a goner.

1975-78 Corvette

1975-78 Corvette | Facebook

We’ll sneak in this third-gen example just to be ecumenical. Plus, it is sharing space with the previous spacey Corvette. We have no idea if the owner of these two gems has plans to mash the two together to create one incredible Corvette, or not. What we can say is that as opposed to its yard bro it is in unmolested shape. Whether it meets a better fate or the two continue to bake in the midwest sun is a mystery.

1963 Corvette #2

1963 Corvette | Facebook

If you thought that the previous split window was a rarity among derelict Corvettes, we present this beauty. It hasn’t been abandoned here for years and years, but it has been idle for some time nonetheless. Those stupid flares were a popular modification but they’re not the end of the world for a Corvette enthusiast. Usually, those will come with six taillights. This one has been spared that indignity. Were you to snag it you might want to just get this heap running and drive it around for a while as is.