The New 2023 Nissan Z Release Date Just Got Leaked

Spring isn’t the only thing creeping closer on the calendar: so is the 2023 Nissan Z release. We got a close look at the 370Z’s retro-inspired successor at the 2022 Chicago Auto Show, and it promptly became our favorite car displayed there. So far, though, a concrete release date hasn’t been available. But thanks to a recent social media post, that’s no longer the case.

A dealership employee leaks when the 2023 Nissan Z goes on sale

The front 3/4 view of a gray 2023 Nissan Z at the 2022 Chicago Auto Show
2023 Nissan Z front 3/4 | Matthew Skwarczek, MotorBiscuit

Although they’ve since deleted it, an alleged Nissan salesperson recently posted some intriguing information on Facebook. Based on his profile, Tommy Bennett is employed at Cleveland, Ohio’s Mountain View Nissan dealership, The Drive reports. And the information he posted was a timeline graphic of the upcoming 2023 Nissan Z.

According to that timeline, Nissan Z production is scheduled to start this month, March 2022. After that, Nissan will roll out its new sports car for press impressions in April. And by June, the first regular-production models should arrive in dealerships. Then, although the Z already appeared in a Super Bowl commercial, Nissan will start a proper marketing push in August.

Will these leaked production and on-sale dates stay accurate?

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As of this writing, Nissan hasn’t officially commented on the alleged 2023 Z timeline post. Neither has the dealership where Bennett allegedly works. And as noted earlier, Bennett deleted it shortly after putting it up.

Yet Nissan has repeatedly stated that the new Z would go on sale in spring 2022. It mentioned this vague date last year when the production version first debuted. So, assuming it doesn’t want to delay sales too much, a March production start makes sense. And press impressions of brand-new cars typically hit before sales start, both to drum up publicity and inform potential buyers.

Furthermore, some Nissan history supports this timeline. Sales of the Nismo version of the Nissan 370Z started on June 17th, 2009. Also, the 350Z originally went on sale in August 2002 as a 2003 model. Plus, the Nissan 300ZX, which was one of the 2023 Z’s design inspirations, went on sale in the US in April 1989. Admittedly, this could be entirely coincidental; and summer is a much better sports car launch time than winter or fall. But hey, there is at least some precedent.

However, it’s worth noting that the alleged timeline doesn’t mention a specific date. Nissan could theoretically start Z production on March 31st and begin sales on June 30th and still be technically on time. Still, it’s at least a better-defined window of time.

The new Nissan Z should offer a lot for your money

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While Nissan hasn’t confirmed the alleged 2023 Z production and dealership arrival timeline, it also hasn’t finalized the starting price. We know it’s ‘around $40K,’ but not a concrete number. However, the details Nissan has publicly confirmed describe an impressive sports car.

Firstly, the new Nissan Z has the same 400-hp twin-turbocharged V6 found in the Infiniti Q60 Red Sport. Secondly, it’s linked to a standard six-speed manual that on Z Performance cars has launch control and automatic rev-matching. A nine-speed automatic will be available as an option, though. Also, the Performance trim gets a limited-slip differential, stickier tires, lighter Rays forged-alloy wheels, and bigger brakes.

Besides more power, torque, and speed than the 370Z, the 2023 Z also has more standard features. Even the base Sport gets a 12.3” digital gauge cluster, 8” touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and an extended advanced driver-assistance safety feature suite. Plus, it has double the cupholders (2).

For some, spring and summer 2022 can’t come soon enough.

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