How Long Does It Take to Charge a 2023 Genesis GV60?

The 2023 Genesis GV60 is a quirky electric SUV that’s filled with a lot of futuristic features. The GV60 is an oddball for sure, but it’s also very comfortable and a blast to drive. I have the Performance version for the week with the dual-motor setup, which can rocket the car up to highway speeds in a few seconds.

However, that fun starts to wane when the battery power gets low. Fortunately, I haven’t had much range anxiety after learning the best way to charge it. Here is how long it takes to charge a Genesis GV60.

The 2023 Genesis GV60 plugged into an Electrify America charger.
The 2023 Genesis GV60 plugged into an Electrify America charger. | Joe Santos, MotorBiscuit

Using a household outlet to charge a 2023 Genesis GV60 is practically pointless

The 2023 Genesis GV60 plugged into the household wall outlet.
The 2023 Genesis GV60 plugged into the household wall outlet. | Joe Santos, MotorBiscuit

I first tried charging the 2023 Genesis GV60 using a household outlet, as most EV buyers would likely do. According to Genesis, it will take around 68 hours to charge the GV60’s 77.4 kWh lithium-ion battery pack from 10% up to 80% using a standard 120-volt outlet. When I plugged the car into my garage’s outlet, while it was at 51%, the car said it would take 51 hours to charge completely.

I plugged it in at night and figured it would at least recoup around 10-15 miles of range in the morning. But I was wrong. The next morning, I returned to the car, unplugged it, and read the display. It had gone up to a whopping 52% after 10 hours of charging. Charging at only 0.6 kW, it didn’t even add enough miles to get to the grocery store and back.

It would taken over 50 hours to charge the GV60 with the Level 1 charger.
It would taken over 50 hours to charge the GV60 with the Level 1 charger. | Joe Santos, MotorBiscuit

I found a better charging source thanks to Electrify America

The screen on the Level 2 charger shows the charging times and cost.
The screen on the Level 2 charger shows the charging times and cost. | Joe Santos, MotorBiscuit

Considering I was scheduled to drive the Genesis GV60 around for a few more days, I knew I needed an adequate charge. I downloaded the Electrify America app and mapped out the nearest station. Fortunately, there was a charging station in the parking lot of my local grocery store.

Once there, I plugged the car in, went through the screen prompts, and the car started charging. To my surprise, the Level 2 charger was charging it at 172 kW, and the car said it would take 11 minutes to get to 80%. Getting to 100% would take 32 mins since the last 20% takes longer.

Instead of waiting by the car, I went into the grocery store to buy a few things, as most EV buyers would likely do. When I made it back to the car, it had been charging for a total of 20 minutes. In that time, the Level 2 charger brought the car up from around 52% to 90%. That quick re-juicing time was due to the CCS – or combined charging system connector – which combines a Level 2 (J1772 standard plug) with a DC fast charging connector.

The combination yields a really fast charge that would have only cost me $17. Fortunately, it ended up being free. I was impressed, to say the least. I was also relieved that I wouldn’t have any range anxiety for the rest of the week.

Is it worth it to charge a Genesis GV60 at home?

The charging screen shown on the 2023 Genesis when plugged into the Level 2 charger.
The Level 2 charger was able to charge the 2023 GV60 much quicker. | Joe Santos, MotorBiscuit

In my experience, it’s not worth using a household outlet to charge the Genesis GV60. I’m guessing it actually cost me more on my electric bill than it was worth in terms of the mileage I gained overnight. In that case, I can only recommend using a Level 2 public charger, or perhaps even a Level 3 charger, which can charge the car from 10% up to 80% in 18 minutes at a rate of 250 kW.

If you plan on purchasing a Genesis GV60 or any other electric car, then I recommend at least purchasing an at-home charger so that it can get an adequate charge overnight. Otherwise, you may be in for a shocking surprise when you find the car only gained five miles after 10 hours of charging.

RELATED: Range Anxiety Removed: Here’s the 5 Longest Range EVs in 2022