Neighborhood Kids Egged Your Car This Halloween? Here’s How to Clean It

Halloween can be a fun, family holiday for dressing up in costumes and scoffing down candy. But it’s also a day where Halloween pranksters come out to play, especially if you’re not giving out candy this year. While I’d love to tell you how to prevent kids from egging your car, there’s no such thing as punk-repellant. So if your vehicle gets vandalized tonight, here’s how to clean the egg off your car.

Egg Cooking On The Ground Next To Car
Egg Cooking On The Ground Next To Car | Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The supplies you’ll need to remove egg from your car aren’t expensive

Unlike some car detailing products, the supplies you need won’t break the bank. In fact, almost everything can be found at your local grocery store. To clean egg off your car, you’ll need the following:

  • Soft, microfiber towels that can be found at any auto parts store
  • Warm water (not boiling)
  • White vinegar
  • A bucket
  • Gloves (optional)
  • A spray bottle (opitional)

With all those items acquired, you’re ready to clean the egg from your car.

How to clean egg off your car

RELATED: Is Egging a Car Illegal?

It’s important to note that time is of the essence, especially on sunny days. Thankfully, most Halloween shenanigans happen at night, but if your car gets egged, you’ll want to catch it quick. That sticky residue on your vehicle will damage the paint if left unattended for too long, so it’s best to catch it early.

Step one is to remove all the eggshells from your car. This is where a pair of gloves would come in handy, as removing the shells can be an icky, sticky job. You’ll want to be sure you get all the shells off too, even the tiny pieces. The next step is to use a damp cloth and clean the remaining egg residue off the car. And If there are bits of shell left over when you wipe, it could scratch the paint.

Chances are, even after you’re done wiping the area clean, there will still be a cooked egg stain on your car. This is where the white vinegar and warm water come in. Mix two cups of the water and the vinegar together in a bucket, soaking one of those soft towels inside the solution. You can also put this solution in a spray bottle and apply it to the stain.

From there, gently apply the tower to any area that still has an egg stain. Let the towel sit for 15 minutes before removing it. If there’s still a stain, soak another towel in the vinegar-water solution and repeat the process. Remove the towel and wipe the area clean with more warm water to remove any leftover vinegar.

However, if the egg has been sitting too long, or was literally cooked by the sun, then the damage may already be done.

If there are still stains, check to see if your car insurance policy covers vandilism

Person Getting Ready To Throw Eggs On Halloween
Person Getting Ready To Throw Eggs | Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

RELATED: My Car Smells Like Rotten Eggs: Why It Smells and What to Do

If you have comprehensive insurance coverage on your vehicle (which you should if it’s worth more than $3,000 or is less than 10 years old according to ValuePenguin), then your insurance provider may cover a new paint job. Keep in mind, a paint job will cost anywhere from $300 to $1000 depending on how badly your car was egged.

That said, the first step in filing a vandalism claim is to contact the police, as vandalism is a criminal offense. Failure to contact the authorities beforehand makes your insurance claim seem suspicious, as if you did the crime and just want some insurance money. Filing a police report lets the insurance company know you’re serious.

However, if that all seems like a hassle over a Halloween prank, or your deductible is worth more than the damage done, you can always try touching up the paint yourself. Most OEM manufacturers and dealerships will carry your car’s exact paint color. Buy a small touch-up kit, and see if you can’t reverse some of the stains. Or maybe you’re like me and know that just living with the stains is cheaper than repairing them.

But here’s hoping your Halloween is one full of fun and festivities rather than unsolicited eggs. Just be on the lookout for those meddling kids, in case your car is their next target.

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