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Hyundai Kona Electric Police Car?

Police forces around the world are increasingly looking at becoming greener. But, they also do not want to sacrifice requirements they already have to do so. So, in addition to adding solar panels to their buildings, and improving recycling programs, a lot of the world’s precincts are identifying their choice of squad cars as a possible avenue to improve upon. Enter the Hyundai Kona Electric.

Police officers stand by a Hyundai Kona Electric that has police livery
A Hyundai Kona Electric is shown in police livery for the St. Gallen Police Department in Switzerland | Hyundai

Kona Electric placed in service

In May 2019, the St. Gallen police department in Switzerland ordered 13 Hyundai Kona Electric units. But, they did not take the decision lightly to add the vehicles to their fleet. Their choice had to meet their requirements for cost, range, availability, and power. The Kona won out. 

So, why would police forces choose such a small car? Well, keep in mind that around the world, the tight old-world streets are not necessarily as wide and comfortable road found just about anywhere in the United States. So, small and nimble cars work well. Also, keep in mind that not all cars are used for patrol duties. Some are used for surveillance duties, where a quiet electric car can surpass the stealth capabilities of other vehicles. Others are used to support administrative, traffic control, and evidence recovery functions. 

Hyundai Kona Electric police car in Spain
A Hyundai Kona Electric is shown in police livery for a police department in Spain | Hyundai

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More of Europe adopts the Kona Electric

The Swiss police are not the only ones that have chosen the Hyundai Kona Electric. According to a post on Green Car Reports yesterday, Spain and the UK also now have Konas in their police fleets. Some of those units have already been delivered, while others are in transit to the departments. The Netherlands is also looking at the possibility of adding the Kona to its police fleet. They are currently testing it to decide. 

The United States

The use of electric vehicles for police departments in the United States is still pretty scarce. The Chevrolet Bolt was called into service in Maryland, the Nissan Leaf in Oregon, Teslas, and the BMW I3 in California. As electric vehicle prices and technology continue to lower their costs, the appeal will certainly grow across law enforcement in the nation. For right now, however, the fleets of the Dodge Charger, Dodge Durango, Ford Explorer, old Ford Crown Victorias, and the Chevrolet Tahoe greatly outnumber the electric counterparts. 

Kona Electric specifications

The Hyundai Kona Electric produces 201 horsepower, 291-lb feet of torque, and a range of 258 miles on a single charge. Zero-to-sixty is at 6.2 seconds. That is good to place the electric Kona as the fastest model of the Kona. The infotainment system has a seven-inch display and connectivity through Apple Carplay or Android Auto. The Kona also has a full suite of safety systems that include forward collision detection, lane-keeping assistance, autonomous braking, and blind-spot monitoring. The overall size makes it roughly the same in proportion as a Kia Soul. 

Hyundai Kona Electric Police Cars lined up in front of a station in Switzerland
Hyundai Kona Electric Police Cars lined up in front of a station in Switzerland | Hyundai

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As police forces around the world continue to embrace greener thinking, their choice of vehicles will also be affected. In time manufacturers will make more and more vehicles available with hybrid or electric capabilities. So, police departments will resultantly be looking at more options to choose from. For now, the Hyundai Kona is starting to be snapped up in Europe. So, consider yourself warned. If you go overseas and get lit up by flashing lights on a Kona, you’ll remember that we warned you that Kona Electric police cars are real.