Electric SUVs that Can Go 200 Miles or More on a Single Charge

These options might work if you don’t want to charge your electric vehicle every night. These are new electric SUVs that can go 200 miles or more on a charge. Check out the most popular electric vehicle charging stations before hopping in your new electric SUV.

The Ford Mustang Mach-E is an electric SUV that can go 200 miles or more

Electric SUVs that can go 200 Miles like the Ford Mustang Mach-E
The 2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E | Ford

When Consumer Reports looked for long-range electric SUVs, the 2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E fit the criteria. If you drive 30 or 40 miles a day, the 224-mile to 314-mile range is enough. Buyers can opt for a larger battery to get 314 miles of range. All-wheel drive is an option but lowers the range slightly to 270 miles. That’s still a pretty long range for a reasonable price.

On a 240V home charger, the Mach-E can take 10 hours to charge up from empty. It can do that overnight when electricity is less expensive, too.

Price Range:  $43,895 – $61,995

Range: 224-314 miles

Hyundai’s Ioniq 5 is an electric SUV that can go 220 miles or more

RELATED: How Much Does It Cost to Charge an Electric Vehicle at Home?

The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 received a lot of accolades from Consumer Reports. It comes recommended, received the green choice award, high scores on the road test, and more. The rear-wheel drive (RWD) 2022 Ioniq 5 has an EPA-estimated maximum range of 303 miles for the single motor. If buyers opt for the all-wheel drive dual motor version, which has 256 miles of range. The standard range RWD Hyundai Ioniq 5 is an electric SUV that can go 220 miles on a single charge.

The Ioniq 5 can stop at DC Fast-Charging stations for a quick charge using the 400V or 800V charging architecture. Buyers can also opt for a slower charge at home.

Price Range:  $39,950 – $55,000

Range: 220-303 miles

Check out the quick and affordable Kia EV6

The 2022 Kia EV6 was designed from the ground up and has netted positive results. It has all of the necessary elements to top Consumer Reports lists, such as the green choice accolade and high scores on the road test. For the long-range RDW version, the EPA-estimated range is 310 miles. For the AWD long-range, buyers can expect to get 274 miles on a full charge. Opting for the standard range RWD version, this EV6 gets 232 miles.

Also compatible with 400V and 800V fast charging, the EV6 can go from 10% State of Charge (SoC) to 80% SoC in 18 minutes.

Price Range:  $41,400 – $56,400

Range: 232-310 miles

The Tesla Model X is an electric SUV that can go 300 miles or more

Consumer Reports has mixed feelings on the 2022 Tesla Model X, but it has the range numbers. Even though the Model X misses out on the recommendation from CR, it has a range of 311 to 348 miles, depending on the version. The Tesla electric SUV has a fancy yoke steering wheel and a pretty high price, but it has a long range.

Charge times aren’t the quickest but the Model X benefits from the Tesla Supercharger network, which kind of makes up for it.

Price Range:  $120,990 – $138,990

Range: 311-348 miles

Depending on which one you choose, the Tesla Model Y gets 244 miles of range or more

The story is similar for the 2022 Tesla Model Y, except Consumer Reports approves a little more. The reliability score still isn’t great, but the owner satisfaction scores makes up for it. Depending on the configuration, the Model Y gets between 244 and 330 miles of range on a single charge.

Tesla’s 240V home charger will take 10 hours to charge the Model Y, but the Supercharger network should make up for it.

Price Range:  $65,990 – $69,990

Range: 244-330 miles

Many factors can impact the range of an electric vehicle, such as extreme weather and larger wheels. Having a home charger is a good way to ensure your EV is charged and ready every morning. Some new electric vehicles come with free charging or a charging credit, so be sure to ask if you order an EV anytime soon. There are likely a few electric vehicle charging stations around you, and you haven’t even noticed.

RELATED: Consumer Reports Least Satisfying Electric SUVs or Hybrids, What to Buy Instead