Convertible Calamity: 5 of the Worst Convertibles Ever Produced

Not every vehicle should have a convertible variant. Unfortunately, there have been many times manufacturers didn’t get that memo throughout history. Though it’s going to be a bit daunting on the eyes, here are the top five worst convertible cars throughout history.

Chrysler Sebring

Red 1997 Chrysler Sebring Convertible front end photograph at Malibu Pier
1997 Chrysler Sebring Convertible | Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Somehow, the Chrysler Sebring convertible came off the showroom floor looking like a grandma had been driving it for 30 years. So, it’s no wonder this thing made the Hotcars list of “The Most Hated Convertibles.”

If you had to analogize the Sebring Convertible with a flavor, it would be a piece of cardboard with a single sprinkle on top. It’s so unbelievable bland to look at. Yet, they tried to spice it up a bit with the drop-top. Auto enthusiasts would love to think the only person Chrysler fooled was Michael Scott from The Office. However, that clearly wasn’t the case, because Chrysler kept this abomination around for two decades.

Later years brought on a more modern design but, to be frank, it really didn’t do the world any favors. The Sebring was discontinued over a decade ago, but the automotive world still feels the stinging of its existence.

Chevrolet SSR

The Chevrolet SSR, short for Super Sport Roadster, was quite a vehicle. Throwing it back to classic hot-rod styling in a modern era was a bold call. Even more daring, though, was deciding to double down on the classic looks and make it convertible.

Really, the only saving grace of the hot-rod pretender SSR is the fact that it was available with an LS engine and a manual transmission. Though, that surprisingly didn’t do much for performance. According to Car and Driver, a 2005 SSR only managed a seven-second zero to 60 mile per hour sprint despite having the same LS2 as a C6 Corvette.

That begs the question; why wouldn’t you just buy a convertible C6 Corvette?

Buick Cascada

Blue 2019 Buick Cascada Convterible parked under freeway overpass
2019 Buick Cascada Convertible | Buick

The Buick Cascada is one of the more recent offenders to make this list. It’s easy to see what they were trying to achieve. It’s got a low, swept windshield and enough room in the back seat to actually seat people in. So, the target audience is someone who caught one of those “that’s not a Buick” commercials and wants a convertible they can still take the family in.

Somehow, though, it just looks goofy. It’s hard for one to pinpoint exactly what’s wrong with it, but it seems a little short, a little too high off the ground, and just overall wrong.

Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet

If you’re into cars, you undoubtedly saw this one coming. For good reason, too. Just look at it!

The appeal of a convertible SUV is there, for sure. There’s undoubtedly a vast amount of people who’d be into the concept of a full open-top experience with the ground clearance and adventure capabilities of an SUV. However, the actual execution of a convertible SUV is not something that is easy to pull off. Of course, the Murano itself is not much of a looker in the first place. Really, any hope of this car coming into fruition as something acceptable to look at was doomed from the start.

If you’re still looking for a free-air offroad adventure, might we suggest a Jeep or a Ford Bronco?

PT Cruiser Convertible

Electric Blue Chrysler PT Cruiser GT Covnertible, Driver's side with top down
Chrysler PT Cruiser GT | Cars and Bids

The poor PT cruiser just gets all kinds of flack. While it is kind of deserved, there are certain ways to appreciate the PT Cruiser to the point that, if it were cheap enough, it’s worth considering buying. The ironic enjoyment of a turbocharged, manual, convertible PT seems pretty worth it.

However, that doesn’t detract from the reason it’s here. It doesn’t take much explaining; just look at it.

Like the SSR, the PT Cruiser is an homage to the roadster and hot-rod styling of the past. Clearly, though, there’s a reason that styling stayed in the past to that point and has since.

These aren’t the only unfortunate-to-look-at convertible cars on the market, either.

From the Chrysler LeBaron convertible holding up the end of the “why is that a convertible” end of the spectrum to the Range Rover Evoque Convertible once again proving that drop-top SUVs aren’t really doable, the list could go on and on.

For the most part, convertible tops should be left to sports cars. There’s just not really an attractive way to have your convertible cake and eat it too when it comes to everyday cars.

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