Consumer Reports Is Not a Fan of the Best-Selling Midsize Truck

Looking at the most recent crop of pickup trucks is a good indication of where the market is. There are many options, most of which are rugged enough to handle most jobs. However, Consumer Reports gave the usually-loved 2022 Toyota Tacoma a reasonably low score. What changed with this best-selling midsize truck?

Consumer Reports didn’t love the 2022 Toyota Tacoma midsize truck

Consumer Reports on the best-selling midsize truck, the 2022 Toyota Tacoma
The 2022 Toyota Tacoma midsize truck set up for camping | Toyota

On Consumer Reports compact pickup truck ratings, the crop of available trucks is pretty new. The 2022 Toyota Tacoma sits relatively low on the list, too. In fifth place, the 2022 Tacoma only racked up a score of 51 out of 100 overall. The Toyota Tacoma has been around since 2005 and has had a relatively good history. The owner satisfaction score and reliability are usually above-average for this best-selling midsize truck.

So what happened with the 2022 Toyota truck? The first signs of a lack of reliability showed up in the 2019 Toyota Tacoma. The reliability verdict from Consumer Reports was lower than usual, showing up at a one out of five. The owner satisfaction score was only a two out of five as well. These scores rebounded for the 2020 and 2021 years, both of which received the “recommended” label.

The new Tacoma only racked up a score of 42 out of 100 overall on the road test. This means that whoever tested it at the Consumer Reports Auto Test Center wasn’t impressed with the ride. The predicted reliability and predicted owner satisfaction only came in at three out of five overall, which is pretty low for this well-loved truck.

What were the main drawbacks noted about the best-selling midsize truck, the Toyota Tacoma?

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Heading into the comfort and convenience section, it was more below-average scores. The ride, noise, seat comfort, and interior fit/finish were all two out of five. “The Tacoma is the perfect truck for landscapers and contractors. This beast of burden has a tough-as-nails chassis and a durable composite­ plastic bed.”

Consumer Reports noted the 2022 Toyota Tacoma was outdated, uncomfortable, and had a stiff ride. The low seats made it feel like the driver was sitting on the floor. It also offered clumsy handling, which explains the low score on the road test. Additionally, Consumer Reports would have liked to see a full-time four-wheel-drive system that can automatically shift between two and four-wheel drive.

On the flip side, the Toyota Tacoma has high resale value. It is also a pretty good vehicle for off-roading, which Consumer Reports noted. It is perhaps this is just an off-year for the Toyota Tacoma when it comes down to it. The long history of reliability and owner satisfaction is a good sign for the Tacoma, even if it isn’t all there for 2022.

What does Edmunds think of this midsize truck?

The 2022 Toyota Tacoma fared better when reviewed by Edmunds. The best-selling midsize truck had a lot of highs that Consumer Reports also noted. It has rugged “off-pavement capability,” and the composite bed is a big win. The top-trim level also has a V6 that can be paired with a manual transmission if so desired.

Some of the lows noted that since the Tacoma is off-road ready, it might be hard for some people to get into it. The steering is also a bit slow for everyday driving on pavement. But overall, Edmunds offered it a positive review. “For decades, it has offered buyers a competent canvas for countless off-road upgrades, and Toyota has been steadily offering more and more aggressive off-roading options to the Tacoma lineup,” Edmunds said.

Everyone has an off-year, and Consumer Reports thinks that is the case for this best-selling midsize truck. Edmunds says it is a best-selling midsize truck for a reason. The 2022 Toyota Tacoma isn’t going anywhere, though, so don’t let your guard down if you are looking to buy.

RELATED: Toyota Tacoma Sales Plummeted for Q1 2022 Compared to 2021