7 of the Worst Compact and Midsize Sedans That You Can Buy in 2022

Technically speaking, there’s no such thing as a bad car in today’s market. You can be sure that almost any new car that you buy will start right up, stop on a dime, and be reliable for many years – with the proper care. However, there are some cars on the new and used market that can be considered bad. These cars may still be reliable, but they can be lackluster when it comes to driving enjoyment and build quality. As such, here are seven of the worst new and used sedans that you can buy in 2022.

1. Honda Clarity

2021 Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid | Honda

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Honda discontinued the Clarity after the 2021 model year, so you would have to look to the used market to buy one now. However, Hot Cars recommends avoiding the plug-in hybrid altogether as it “feels very dull to drive” and doesn’t get the same type of fuel economy as competitors like the Hyundai Ioniq.

One of the Honda Clarity’s highlights is that it can get up to 48 miles on a pure electric charge, but after that, it only gets decent fuel (40 mpg) in its hybrid form. In that case, buyers could be better off buying a used Honda Accord Hybrid or even a new Accord sedan to get the same type of fuel economy.

2. Chrysler 300

2022 Chrysler 300S
2022 Chrysler 300S | Stellantis

There’s no denying that the Chrysler 300 is quite the looker. Its budget Bentley styling makes it look a lot more expensive than its $33,000 price tag entails and it offers quite a good value for a large sedan. However, the main issue is that the 300’s interior styling hasn’t changed in years, and getting into it will make you feel like you’re getting into a car that’s 10 years old.

The interior materials feel cheap to the point that rivals from Genesis feel far more premium and its V8 engine is a little archaic in an era where turbocharged engines reign supreme. We admit that it’s still nice to hear the rumble of a V8 though.

3. Kia Forte

A silver 2022 Kia Forte parked outdoors.
2022 Kia Forte | Kia

The Kia Forte continues to offer buyers on a tight budget and excellent value. It looks sporty and offers plenty of equipment for the money. However, Car and Driver reports that it struggles to keep up with the competition from Honda and Mazda due to its adequate driving feel. The CVT transmission is partially to blame as it makes the Forte accelerate laggardly compared to its rivals and also contributes to a noisy cabin under harder acceleration.

4. Toyota Mirai

2022 Toyota Mirai
2022 Toyota Mirai | Toyota

There might be a place for hydrogen-fueled cars in the future, however, the Toyota Mirai was just too ahead of its time. The Mirai was met with dismal sales during its time on the market, mainly due to the lack of infrastructure for hydrogen fuel stations. In fact, all of the stations are in California, so you can see why the Mirai didn’t sell well. Purchasing a full electric vehicle would be a better choice.

5. Nissan Sentra

2022 Nissan Sentra front
2022 Nissan Sentra | Nissan

While the Nissan Sentra undercuts the competition from Honda, Toyota, and Mazda, that cheaper price is fitting of its overall quality. According to Hot Cars, “[the Sentra] would be totally passable if it were the only car in the segment,” but unfortunately, it is not. The Sentra’s cheaper interior quality and layout make rivals stand out as a better choice.

6. Maserati Ghibli

A grey Maserati Ghibli driven down the road.
Maserati Ghibli | Maserati

At first glance, the Maserati Ghibli may seem like one of the best and fanciest sedans you can buy, and it is. However, it’s not exactly worth its luxury price tag. The base Ghibli GT model puts out less horsepower than a Kia Stinger. And while you can step up to the higher Trofeo trim with the Ferrari-derived V8 engine, it’s not exactly worth the $115,000 starting price. Do yourself a favor and stick to a BMW, Mercedes, or even a Kia, instead.

7. Mitsubishi Mirage

The 2022 Mitsubishi Mirage has a low starting price
The Mitsubishi Mirage | Mitsubishi

Last, but definitely not least, is the Mitsubishi Mirage. What can we say about the Mirage that has not been said before? Although the Mirage only costs around $14,500, that low price tag comes at a larger price. Cheap materials, a shoddy build quality, and a 78-hp engine that makes for painfully slow acceleration mean that the Mirage isn’t worth buying. You would be better off spending the same amount of money on a used Honda Civic.

The worst sedans in 2022

If you’re looking for a midsize or compact sedan that blends style, power, reliability, and quality all in one package, you won’t find one on this list. That doesn’t technically mean that these cars are completely terrible, it’s just that certain traits make them undesirable. If you’re in the market for a new or used sedan, you may want to stay away from these models.

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