3 Things Consumers Reports Hates About the 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS

The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS is the automaker’s flagship electric sedan, kicking off the automaker’s next generation of EVs. It’s decked out with all of the manufacturer’s finest interior materials and technology features, including a gorgeous Hyperscreen on higher trims. It’s also as fun to drive as the original S-Class sedan, especially with its quick electric power delivery.

Given its performance and aesthetic appeal, a glowing review from Consumer Reports was practically a given. Still, while the Mercedes-Benz EQS is close to perfect, Consumer Reports was concerned about three specific problem areas.

1. The Mercedes-Benz EQS’s brake pedal feel

A white 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS parked outdoors.
Mercedes-Benz EQS | Getty Images

According to Consumer Reports, the brakes inside this EV sometimes feel mushy and even unsettling. When using the regenerative braking function, the pedal responds by moving itself under your foot. Consumer Reports predicts that most drivers will not appreciate that surprise, nor the amount of travel it needs to hit the car floor.

Still, the Mercedes-Benz EQS posted decent braking scores, coming to a complete stop from 60 mph at 133 ft. If you’re braking on wet pavement, you’ll probably need 148 ft to stop the car. During the avoidance maneuver test, the EQS could swerve safely at speeds up to 56 mph with minimal body roll.

Consumer Reports was pleased with every other aspect of the Mercedes-Benz EQS’s performance, especially its acceleration. Consumer Reports used the fully-loaded EQS 580 Premium for this test, which gets to 60 mph in 4 seconds flat. It generates 516 hp and 611 lb-ft of torque, equipped with standard AWD.

The base 450+ models are relatively inexpensive and more conservative in terms of power, with 329 hp on tap. Consumer Reports says that this sedan is too heavy to be deemed athletic, but it still handles its abundant speed with confidence. Testers also enjoyed the EQS’s whisper-quiet cabin, quick steering, and plush suspension.

Best of all, the Mercedes-Benz EQS is fast while maintaining competitive electric ranges for the segment. The 450+ trims can travel 350 miles on a single charge, and the 580 models only lose 10 miles of range. However, Consumer Reports test car frequently displayed an estimated range of 400 miles.

2. An uncomfortable driving position

Inside the Mercedes-Benz EQS, the dashboard’s placement is too high compared to the driver’s low seating position. Many drivers will have to elevate their seats or the steering wheel, compromising overall comfort. Consumer Reports also says that the seats lack adequate bolstering.

Those quibbles aside, the seats are just as comfortable as you’d expect from a Benz. They’re made from either standard or Nappa leather plus come with ventilation and heating functions. On Consumer Reports’ top-tier model, test drivers also got to experience the massagers and cushion extenders.

While its low roofline infringes somewhat on headroom, the Mercedes-Benz EQS can easily accommodate three adults in its rear row. You can also option the seats back there with rapid heating and massaging, plus electronically-adjustable lumbar support.

Consumer Reports test drivers could fit three suitcases and two large duffel bags in the EQS’s cargo area. In total, it has 63 cubic feet of cargo space available. It also has a flat load floor, an exterior opening mechanism, and more flexibility thanks to the 60/40 split-folding rear seats.

3. Some distracting controls

While the Mercedes-Benz EQS’s high-tech interior is part of its appeal, some controls are hard to master or just downright annoying. Lumbar adjustments must be configured through the touchscreen and is difficult to locate audio controls within the infotainment interface. 

You can adjust your preferred radio and comfort settings before you’re ready to drive, though this isn’t a convenient solution. Fortunately, all the touchscreen’s menus are easy to read and respond quickly to your inputs. The in-car assistant also responds eagerly to voice commands.

RELATED: Is the Hyperscreen in the 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 450+ a Pain to Use?