2023 Tesla Model 3: Release Date, Price, and Specs

Tesla’s Model 3 is the most popular and most affordable electric vehicle (EV) in the automaker’s stable, and long wait times and occasionally frustrating features aren’t enough to deter buyers. Most people need to get on a waitlist to buy a back-ordered Tesla Model 3, but it’s still the best value among luxury EVs. Will the newest model bring any real changes? Read on for 2023 Tesla Model 3 release date information, specs, interior features, range, and more.

When can I order a 2023 Tesla Model 3?

A white 2023 Tesla Model 3 plugged into a charging station set against a crisp white background
Tesla Model 3 charging | Tesla

When will the 2023 Tesla Model 3 be available? This is a tricky question with more than one answer. When you can order a new Model 3 and when you can actually get one are two very different timelines. 

Edmunds estimates that the 2023 Tesla Model 3 release date will fall sometime in the winter of 2023, but buyers likely won’t be able to take delivery of their new electric luxury car for months after that. Some buyers have reported that current model-year Model 3 EVs are back-ordered by anywhere between 7-11 months, and that likely won’t change with the new model year.

A lack of attainability and a long wait is nothing new for Tesla fans, though. Expect that even if the 2023 Model 3 goes on sale early next year, you may not be able to get one until at least spring or summer of 2023.

How much will the Tesla Model 3 cost in 2023?

White Tesla Model 3 luxury electric car set against a dark background
Tesla Model 3 | Tesla

How much will a Tesla be in 2023? The Model 3 has always been the cheapest option among Telsa EVs, and we can expect that will stay about the same for the new year. 

Fans and future buyers have been hoping for a Tesla Model 3 price drop for 2023, but it doesn’t seem likely. According to Edmunds, “the only concern for Model 3 buyers is the price trajectory over the last few years. The Model 3’s MSRP has slowly crept upward, and it seems like the dream of a $35,000 Tesla will stay exactly that, a dream.”

Whether or not Tesla will lower prices in the coming year, the Model 3 is still one of the cheapest EVs by the mile and offers a lower cost of ownership than many other cars. Edmunds estimates that the cost of a Tesla Model 3 in 2023 will start at around $48,000, slightly above what the 2022 model costs now. That would place the 2023 Model 3 Long Range at around $59,000 and the 2023 Model 3 Performance at around $64,000.

Keep in mind, also, that Model 3 EVs have shockingly good resale value. So, even if the 2023 Tesla Model 3’s price is a little higher than consumers would like, you may still come out ahead in total costs.

2023 Tesla Model 3 specs, changes, and updates

We don’t anticipate any significant changes to the 2023 Model 3 unless Tesla has a major switch in direction in the next few months. That means that the new model will likely offer very similar specs and range to the current model. 

2023 Tesla Model 3 specs will likely reflect the following:

  • Between 272 miles (Base) and 358 miles (Long Range) of EV range
  • Rear-wheel drive (Base) or all-wheel drive (Long Range/Performance)
  • 0-60 mph in as little as 3.1 seconds
  • Panoramic glass roof
  • Heated front and rear seats
  • Heated steering wheel
  • 15-inch touchscreen infotainment system

A fully loaded Tesla Model 3 adds features like a 13-speaker premium sound system, a carbon-fiber rear spoiler, and other goodies.

Should you wait for the 2023 Model 3 or order a 2022 model now?

Interior of the 2023 Tesla Model 3, likely very similar to the 2022 model
Tesla Model 3 interior

The Model 3 is the only Tesla recommended by Consumer Reports at the moment, and it does have plenty to offer among premium electric vehicles.

If you’ve been considering making the switch to an EV, there’s no reason that we can see to wait for the release of the 2023 Model 3. You’ll likely be able to get all of the same features, performance, and range now—for possibly a lower price.

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