The Only 2 Things Consumer Reports Hates About the 2022 Nissan Rogue

Consumer Reports’ assessment of the 2022 Nissan Rogue is out, and while the reviewer doesn’t seem to love the compact SUV, it doesn’t hate it either. The SUV gets an overall 63 out of 100 score, which is a few points shy of the website’s closest recommended option, the 2022 Toyota RAV4, getting a 65 out of 100. Nevertheless, the reviewer only has two main complaints about the new SUV.

The Nissan Rogue’s abrupt acceleration

A silver 2022 Nissan Rogue siting in front of background of trees.
2022 Nissan Rogue | Nissan Motor Corporation

Concerning the road test, the 2022 model year Nissan Rogue got an 80 out of 100, implying that it did pretty well in most areas. However, the vehicle’s acceleration was one of the few problem areas. According to Consumer Reports, the car gets off the line rather abruptly, giving the sensation that it’s quicker and more powerful than expected.

This is bound to startle first-time drivers of the compact SUVs, although it may get easier with time and experience. Unfortunately, some passengers may not have the luxury of driving with you every day, meaning they may never get used to the anxiety-inducing feeling.

Also worth noting is the initial burst of power is short-lived and may not be there when drivers need it. Nevertheless, this shouldn’t be a problem if you’re not consistently going up hills or merging onto busy highways.

The compact SUV’s vent placements

The vehicle’s climate control features are mostly good, with heated mirrors, heated seats, and even a heated steering wheel being some highlights depending on trim level. Additionally, the Rogue comes with dual-zone automatic climate control, allowing drivers and passengers to choose their preferred settings.

The fact that the manufacturer hasn’t moved away from physical buttons to a touch-sensitive interface also helps. However, there’s a caveat in the design with Nissan placing the center dashboard vents too low. Consequently, instead of providing air conditioning to the driver’s torso and upper body like they’re supposed to, they end up cooling the knees and elbows.

What Consumer Reports likes about the Rogue

As for what the reviewer likes in the Nissan rogue, one is the controls. Most manufacturers seem to be pivoting away from physical controls and replacing them with touch screens. The 2022 Tesla Model Y is an excellent example, with most electric cars’ controls on the touch screen. According to Tesla, some of these controls can also be accessed and adjusted via voice command.

This shift to touch screens is the numerous features included in modern car interfaces. However, these screens can be confusing, with physical, well-labeled buttons and knobs more intuitive. The manufacturer’s choice to retain the physical controls in the 2022 Nissan Rogue is a pro.

Another positive Consumer Reports listed is the access, with the SUV’s rear door opening almost 90 degrees. Other bells and whistles to make access easier include well-positioned rear seats and the fact that the door sills are pushed slightly inward. Consequently, parents can strap their kids in or attach baby car seats without banging their shins.

Next, the Nissan SUV may not be the quickest on the road, but it has the agility to make up for it. According to the reviewer, it seems to glide through corners and twisty roads as long as you keep the cruising speeds moderate. It’s not advisable to push it to the limits as it creates problems with the electronic stability control system and enhances body lean.

Lastly, there’s the transmission that Consumer Reports notes maintain the strengths of a CVT without its weaknesses. It can still ensure peak performance and good fuel economy while simulating the gear shifts that are more common with automatic and manual transmissions.

Furthermore, the paddle shifters provided with the car are functional and allow drivers to shift gears up and down through eight pre-determined ratios. Consequently, the Rogue’s transmission is more engaging than a traditional CVT.

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