Automotive News

10 Greatest Cruiser Motorcycles Ever Made

Everyone knows the basics of what makes a motorcycle a cruiser. You have a big, comfortable seat just below the fuel tank with handlebars reaching back toward you, reducing strain on your arms. Cruisers are all about riding long distances rather than buzzing through city streets in rush hour traffic. Sacrificing speed for torque, a great cruiser must have the ability to take on any road you come across on your travels. 

With the first appearances of electric motorcycles and the rise of smaller, but faster and more efficient city bikes (not to mention the decline in superbikes), the cruiser has been under the radar in recent years.

A great cruiser motorcycle must be able to handle a road trip to the next county or state comfortably and exude classic cool doing it. These ten cruisers are a cut above the rest of the pack.

Indian Chief

The original was produced until 1922, but the Indian Chief lives on. It is instantly recognizable by its extra large saddle-like seat, giant floorboards, and classic, curvy fenders right out of the ’50s. Riding an Indian Chief, with all that room to plant down in, is like a dream out of the past. A beautiful relic of a lost era, and incredibly expensive and rare these days.

Moto Guzzi MGX-21

The debut of the Moto Guzzi MGX-21 in 2014 was the source of great discussion in the industry. Its 21-inch front wheel, all carbon fiber design, and saddlebags with enough storage space to carry almost 130 pounds make it an ideal cruiser fit for even the most discerning traveler.

Ducati XDiavel

If you are still not willing to compromise your need for speed in your search for a cruiser motorcycle, the XDiavel will make every day Christmas Day. Riders of the XDiavel can do a top speed of 150 miles per hour, thanks to the Testastretta L-Twin, which only Ducati manufactures.

Yamaha Bolt R-Spec

The Yamaha Bolt was introduced in 2014 and ever since has been a reliable and low-priced cruising bike. The R-Spec is the newest evolution of the line featuring an air-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine with fenders that are “bobbed out”, or free of any elements non-essential to cruising.

Honda Fury

The Fury just keeps getting more and more popular as a cruiser ever since its debut ten years ago. Honda’s attempt at a chopper-style motorcycle was spot on from the start, winning new fans with its evolving design that is very easy on the eyes and wallet.

Honda Rebel 500

The stylishness of the Fury gives way to its stripped-down stablemate, the Honda Rebel 500. It is not a bike that will win you any ribbons, but it is perfect for the beginning bike enthusiast. The Rebel 500 is speedy and quick, but affordable and simple. Everything you need to get on the road and start riding.

Triumph Rocket III Roadster

Triumph is still around, and after 15 years the Rocket is still a great cruiser motorcycle. The only British-made bike on the list, the newest of the Rocket models to come along is the Rocket III. If you can handle the weight of it, the Rocket III is a torque monster with a 2294cc inline-three cylinder engine.

https://instagram.com/p/BS0k25sB6ns/

Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom

Kawasaki has been making the Vulcan for 30 years but is still giving a strong showing with the new 900 Custom. A narrower seat and slightly different chassis geometry make it a more effective cruiser than the 900 Classic. But the liquid-cooled V-twin is the same as in all the Vulcans.

Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.

The “power-cruiser” has started to see its popularity grow in recent years, and the M109R is Suzuki’s premier entry into the power cruising sub-category. The B.O.S.S. is absolutely stunning to see on the road with its blackout color scheme. It’s also quite fast enough with a dual throttle system that can give you an extra boost on the highway, just in case you need it.

Harley Davidson Softail Deluxe

Of course, we would not forget the Harley Softail, how could we? The Softail Deluxe models have the newest Harley engine, the “Milwaukee-Eight” 107. Less vibration means a more comfortable ride, and the “Milwaukee-Eight” does it with no sacrifice of torque.